Topic Punjabi Turban Breaking News Dastar Sira World Turban Coach Patiala Shahi Academy Centre Office Classes

Sikhs Turban removed by force in Chandigarh’

First And Best World Number One Turban Website <> http://www.punjabiturban.com/

rd dulband and has been in existence time immemorial. Traditionally, wearing a turban is a sign of holiness and spirituality; it testifies a symbol of respectability. The Sanskrit word pak from which the Panjabi pagg or turban is derived from and stands for maturity and standing in society. It takes numerous interpretations. For example, pagg di laj rakkhna, literally meaning to maintain the honour of the turban; pagg lahuan, lit. to knock off the turban means to insult and pag vatauna is to exchange turbans to signify the transformation of friendship into brotherhood vowing fraternal love and loyalty. A bridegroom, irrespective of the religious tradition would as a rule wear a turban on his wedding. Turban as a Symbol of Responsibility People who have lived in India would know the Turban tying ceremony known as Rasam Pagri (Turban Tying Ceremony). This ceremony takes place once a man passed away and his oldest son takes over the family responsibilities by tying Turban in front of a large gathering. It signifies that now he has shouldered the responsibility of his father and he is the head of the family. The Sikhs have a religious importance. Infact, along with untrimmed hair, turban has become a distinguishing feature of the Sikhs male all over and this includes the females who wear their keskis. The Guru wore the turbans and their disciples naturally emulated them. Guru Arjan Dev Ji, the firth Guru, described the true man of God had mentioned turban being a part of ideal appearance. (SGGS 1084). By the time of Guru Hargobind Singh, Sikhs began to think themselves equals of the beturbaned ruling class, the Mughals. In 1699, Guru Gobind Singh Ji, on cretio of the Khalsa Panth, apart from the 5 Ks-kesh, kangha, Kara, kachhera and kirpan, turban became an obligatory item of dress to keep the long hair neatly tied up and the females followed suit. The color of the turban meant some significance but on the whole, the turban became the insignia for the Sikhs, The turban being religiously obligatory for the Sikhs, a more tolerant view has been taken but the recent treatment of the Sikhs has caused disturbances and repercussions globally. Turban is and has been an inseparable part of a Sikh’s life. Since Guru Nanak Dev Ji, the founder of Sikhism, all Sikhs have been wearing Turban. Dr. Trilochan Singh’s book on “Biography of Guru Nanak Dev Ji.” Clearly indicate its importance. All Sikh Gurus wore Turban. The Sikh Rehat Maryada (Sikh Code of Conduct) specifically says that all Sikhs must wear a Turban. According to the Rehatnama of Bhai Chaupa Singh Ji, contemporary of Guru Gobind Singh Ji, the five Kakkars of Sikhism were: Kachha special underwear), Kara (a steel bracelet), Kirpan (small sword), Kangha (comb) and Keski (a small Turban). Guru Gobind Singh Ji says, “Kangha dono vakt kar, paag chun kar bandhai.”(Comb your hair twice a day and tie your Turban carefully, turn by turn.”) Bhai Chaupa Singh Ji says, “Kachh, Kara, Kirpan, Kangha, Keski, Eh panj Kakar rehat dhare Sikh soi.”(The five Kakkars of Sikhism are special underwear, steel bracelet, sword, comb, and a small Turban. A person who wears all these Sikh symbols should be considered a practicing Sikh. Several ancient Sikh documents refer to the order of Guru Gobind Singh Ji about wearing five Ks. Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu is one of the most famous ancient Sikh historians, the author of “Sri Guru Panth Parkash” in which he wrote almost two centuries ago. He writes, “Doi vele utth bandhyo dastare, pahar aatth rakhyo shastar sambhare| . . . Kesa(n) ki kijo pritpal, nah(i) ustran se katyo vaal ” (“Sri Guru Granth Parkash” by Bhai Rattan Singh Bhangu, page 78)(“Tie your Turban twice a day and carefully wear weapons 24 hours a day. Take good care of your hair. Do not cut your hair.”) The following information describes the importance of Turban: Holiness and Spirituality: Turban is a symbol of spirituality and holiness in Sikhism. When Guru Amar Das Ji left for heavenly abode, his elder son Pirthi Chand wore A Turban, which is usually worn by an elder son when his father passes away. At that time Guru Arjan Dev Ji was honored with the Turban of Guruship. Marne di pag Pirthiye badhi. Guriyaee pag Arjan Ladhi. (“Partakh Hari,” Jivani Guru Arjan Dev Ji, by Principal Satbir Singh) Guru Angad Dev Ji honoured Guru Amar Das Ji with a Turban (Siropa) when he was made the Guru. Similarly, the Turban (Dastaar) has remained the key aspect in a Sikh’s honour. Those who have selflessly served the community are honored with Turbans. Sikh initiation ceremony (Khande ki pahul) is one of the most important ceremonies in a Sikhs’ life. That ceremony cannot be completed without wearing a Turban. Indeed, a short-Turban (called a Keski) is one of the five requirements for Sikhs. The most revered Sikh symbol is hair. The Turban is required of every Sikh in order to cover his/her hair. This is also the primary reason the comb (Kangha) is another one of the five requirements in the Sikh way of life. All the Sikh Gurus wore turban. Throughout our short history, all Sikhs have been required to do so. The Turban has indeed become synonymous with Sikhism. Turban as a Robe of Honor The highest honor that a Sikh religious organization can bestow upon any individual is a Siropa. It is a blessing of the Guru, which is bestowed upon a person who has devoted a major portion of his/her life for the welfare of the Sikh or the humanity in general. Sometimes a Siropa is also bestowed upon the families of Sikhs martyrs turban. Even in Punjab removing a turban from a person’s head was considered a sign of mourning. Bhai Gurdas, a Sikh savant, who enjoyed patronage of Guru Arjan Dev Ji and contemporary of the several Sikh Gurus writes in his Vars: Tthande khuhu naike pag visar(i) aya sir(i) nangai |Ghar vich ranna(n) kamlia(n) dhussi liti dekh(i) kudhange | (Vara(n) Bhai Gurdas, Var 32, Pauri 19) (A person, after taking a bath at the well during winter time,forgot his Turban at the well and came home bareheaded. When the women saw him at home without a Turban, they thought someone had died and they started to cry.) Turban and Sikh Military Life Turban is a symbol of honor and self-respect. The Sikh Army fought their last major battle against the British in 1845. All the Sikh soldiers and generals were wearing Turbans at that time. Shah Muhammad, a great Punjabi poet and historian, who witnessed that war, writes: Pichhe baitth sardara(n) Gurmatta kita, Koi akal da karo ilaj yaro. Sherh burshia (n) di sade pesh ayee, Pag dahrhia (n) di rakho laaj yaro. The Sikh chiefs took a unanimous and firm religious decision (Gurmatta), that they should have sense enough to judge the tenor of aharani Jinda(n) Kaur and the devious colonialists. They said that they were facing a very shrewd enemy and it was high time for them to save their honor because they were wearing Turbans and beards (both symbols of self-respect). The Sikh soldiers refused to wear helmets during World War I and World War II. They fought with Turbans on their heads. A Sikh (Khalsa) is supposed to be fearless. Wearing a helmet is admitting fear of death. Many Sikhs received Victoria Cross, which is one of the most prestigious gallantry awards in the British army. Many Sikhs refused to remove Turban even in jails. Bhai Randhir Singh Ji, a widely respected Sikh preacher, scholar and a freedom fighter had to undergo a fast to win his right to wear Turban in the prison; his sacrifices and perseverance to uphold the Sikh faith was very staunch and immutable. High Moral Values: Sikh history is full of facts that men and women of other faiths such as Hindus and Muslims felt safe when there was a Sikh around them. They felt secure from invaders and other people when Khalsa was around. The woman or the oppressed would feel safe and sound under the protection of “Khalsa”. It was a common saying in Punjab: “Aye nihang, booha khol de nishang” (The Nihangs (Sikhs) are at the door. Dear woman, go ahead open the door without any fear whatsoever.) In ancient times, the Sikh men had to fight tough battles with the rulers. They moved from village to village at night. Sometimes they had to hide. Women folks had a very high degree of trust in the Nihangs (Sikhs) who can be clearly identified with a Turban and beard. Women knew that the Nihangs (Sikhs) were of high moral character and never mistreated or molested women. So they fed them and helped them in whatever way they could. Turban – A Symbol of Missionary Zeal and Courage There are many references in the Sikh history that describe how Guru Gobind Singh Ji personally tied beautiful Dumalas (Turbans) on the heads of both his elder sons Baba Ajit Singh Ji and Baba Jujhar Singh Ji and how he personally gave them arms, decorated them like bridegrooms, and sent them to the battlefield at Chamkaur Sahib where they both received martyrdom. When the Sikhs go to an agitation (Morcha), they usually wear a saffron color Turban which is a symbol of sacrifice and martyrdom. When Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale courted his arrest, he wore a saffron color Turban. There are different styles in tying a turban and the time and pride that goes in doing so, shows the respect for their Gurus. Whilst tying, the cloth does not touch the ground or floor and it is done with great dexterity and finesse. “Khoob teri pugri, Meethae tere bol” (Your turban is beautiful and your words are sweet and tender) It was meant for only kings. Minorities were not allowed to wear Turban and Kirpan. “Ouch Dumalra” Most respectful. Bare head is not considered appropriate as per Gurbani:”Oud oud raavaa jhaate paaye, vekhe lok hasae ghar jaaye” If a Sikhs likes to become one with his/her Guru, he/she must look like a Guru (wear a Turban). Guru Gobind Singh Ji has said, “Khalsa mero roop hai khaas. Khalse me hau karo nivas.”(Khalsa (Sikh) is a true picture of mine. I live in a Khalsa.)…
Added by Binder Kaur at 4:49pm on March 30, 2011
Comment on: Topic ‘Can a Sikh guy marry a hindu Girl who has already adopted the sikh way of life?’
embarrassed by the appearance..I live in Australia and i have seen so many of them..when they travel back home grow a little beard and put on the turban to be still identified as a SIKH..i say those who don’t keep Gurmukhi they have definetly converted back to Hindus and they shouldn’t be SINGH any more just like anyother punjabi. Manpreet bhai ji as far the concern of Sikhism suffering in future is concerned…if you see there is a decline in every religion as the world is changing..we cannot hold or control anything but we can only try to give the same values to next Generations and make it less controversial by identifying other Punjabis as Hindu despite their belief in the same religion. We are one not forget Sri Guru Nanak Dev Ji was born to a hindu Sri Mehta Kalu Ji and baba ji firmly believed and worshipped Lord Ram that’s why we see name of Lord Ram in our holy pride Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. It’s time we stop looking at people differently if someone’s not wearing a turban..Oh he is Hindu..Oh he has a long beard and wearing Turban thats our very own SIKH brother. I think people worry more about to be physically identified as a SIKH at times and tend to forget the basic teachings of Baba ji as in Vand Chakkna, Kirat Karna, Naam Japna. I don’t the statistics but most of our community is know and famous for indulging in heavy drinking and feasting on non veg…isn’t that something we should be concerned about other than the physical attributes. Waheguru ji ka Khalsa, Waheguru ji ki Fateh. …
Added by nbagga at 1:31am on June 28, 2012
Blog Post: Canadian Hindu Advocacy Group Spreading Hatred Towards Sikhs and Muslims!
Ron Banerjee of The Canadian Hindu Advocacy group is conveniently riding the wave of anti-Sikh hysteria being perpetuated by current ideological and political views of the Bloc Quebecios. In his…
Added by Manpreet Singh at 12:51pm on January 31, 2011
Comment on: Topic ‘How To Revert Our Diverted Boys & Girls Back To SIKHISIM.????’
ciples and attributes one should as per Khalsa pant but sadly when i take non punjabi friends to Gurudwara they can definetly note a difference in the way someone wearing a turban even with trimmed beard is welcomed and treated in comparion to clean shaved guy at times i also feel really bad but don’t get dejected from my faith and belief in Sikhism and this is a message to all those who don’t let others feel comfortable in the community we mat not read ad write for circumstantial reasons and wear turban but it doesn’t make any less Sikh as it doesn’t deviate me from my belief in my religion and my Gurus… Bhul Chuk Maaf Karni Ji…
Added by nbagga at 11:22pm on August 22, 2012
Topic: Sikhs who do not know Gurmukhi need to RESOLVE to learn the language
ow Gurmukhi need to RESOLVE to learn the language. Most communities are proud of their language, but many of us Sikhs have lost touch with our culture because we do not know or understand the language. Most people associate Sikhs with Bhangra and enjoyment. That is fine. But who is a true Sikh as envisioned by Guru Nanak Devji and Guru Gobind Singh ji? A true Sikh is not one who only wears a turban, but one who reads Gurbani regularly and lives under the intoxication of Waheguru’s Name. In Guru Nanak devji’s words “NAAM KHUMARI NANAKA CHARI RAHE DIN RAAT”. Sikhs are actually prohibited from drinking or any other “nashaa”. The only “nashaa” for a true Sikh is the intoxication of Waheguru’s Naam.…
Added by GKK SINGH at 8:35pm on April 29, 2011
Comment on: Topic ‘How To Revert Our Diverted Boys & Girls Back To SIKHISIM.????’
f wearing Tshirts that say “I am a Sikh” etc to tell people who you are. Why dont we use the separate identity given to us by our Gurus. Main jithe job karda haan… othe v kuch Sikh ne jinna kesh katwaye hoye ne… te aapne aap nu Sikh dekhaun layi edaan diya Tshirts paundene. My question to them is… if they are so proud to be a Sikh that they are wearing shirts to prove this… then why dont they wear a turban and have grow kesh. Why to fit in when you were born to stand out ?? Please dont take it personally. Wahe Guru ji ka khalsa Wahe Guru ji ki fatehnbagga said: First and foremost would be acknowledge others around as one as your people i am a mona but do consider myself as my forefathers were, i don’t call myself Khalsa because i haven’t adapted all the principles and attributes one should as per Khalsa pant but sadly when i take non punjabi friends to Gurudwara they can definetly note a difference in the way someone wearing a turban even with trimmed beard is welcomed and treated in comparion to clean shaved guy at times i also feel really bad but don’t get dejected from my faith and belief in Sikhism and this is a message to all those who don’t let others feel comfortable in the community we mat not read ad write for circumstantial reasons and wear turban but it doesn’t make any less Sikh as it doesn’t deviate me from my belief in my religion and my Gurus…Bhul Chuk Maaf Karni Ji …
Added by Manpreet Singh at 3:49am on August 23, 2012
Comment on: Topic ‘Khalsai Culture Is mixing up with Punjabi culture by Indain Media ..’
all the means failed, they looked for other means and all this started. First the started distributing Drugs in punjab so that the youth gets away from Sikhi and then they introduced Deras and fake babas to entice the uneducated Sikhs and take them away from sikhi. Then they started to make fun of Sikhs on national TV and started anti-sikh jokes on Santa-Banta(which happens to be Shaheed Satwant Singh ji and Beant Singh ji who assasinated Indira). This was an easy mean as more and more Sikh youth thought that being a Sikh and wearing a turban is just similar to being a joker. So they started cutting their hair and getting clean shaved. This had an impact on sikhs girls as well. Then in TV serials, they started showing that for Sikhs girls, it is ok to marry a Hindu guy and that can happen in Gurudwara itself, where as Guru Gobind Singh ji said that the Anand karaj can only take place between a Sikh girl and a Sikh boy. There are many examples in which the media has played its idiotic role to denigrate Sikhs. And its not that the media doesnt know about Sikhs. They know everything, but they do this on purpose. Like in the case of Sant Bhindrawala ji. Media was the one which was controlled by the Govt. and they use to give false info about Sant ji and his followers on national TV in order to make the india go against them.Dr. Manmeet Singh said: Sachi Gal eh hai ki Media Nu vi sadde baare kuch jyaada nai pata…. punjabi and sikh vich ki fark penda hai…??? this kind of thinking they have…. they dont know the meaning of the word punjabi and SIKH…!!!! Punjab de rehn waale punjabi honge… Gujrat de rehn waale Gujraati….and so on…. Tussi Media de baare keh rahe C…. wht according to U is MEDIA ??? who is MEDIA according to U..???? Media is composed of Sooo Many people of different Cast/ Creed/ religion….!!!! each individual is diffenrt there… the problem is that majority of these people lack knowledge about us….. and know nothing abt Sikhs… the word Media is a general terminology for entertainment… like TV// Radio…cinema hall… News ..etc… MEDIA remains the Same… people woking for it Keep changing… unless the peple of INDIA Know what SIKH religion is ……… Media will also not improve… But we can at least to something that woud make the Media Personel understand that they shudnt show Sardars and a JOKER and make a mokery of HIM…!!! and also shud not show any Sardar with alcohol etc…

Topic ‘Can a Sikh guy marry a hindu Girl who has already adopted the sikh way of life?’
s are like that but most of them are. And I stay firm on this. The other thing that you said is that Guru Nanak Dev ji was born to a Hindu family. That doesn’t means that we are the same. Getting born into a Hindu family doesn’t mean that one is a hindu. It depends on what principles and values you follow. Guru Nanak dev ji clearly rejected the rituals and principles of Hindus. And they gave us the fundamental principles of Sikhism which are in no concordance with Hinduism. I request you to please get more knowledge about Sikhism because whatever you have written about Hindu God Ram is no where mentioned in Guru Granth Sahib ji. In Sikhism, the Almighty God or Wahe Guru is also known by various other names like HAR, SAI, RAM, GOBIND etc. There is no reference of Hindu Gods in Guru Granth Sahib ji. THe word RAM has been used throughout the history even before the mention of Hindu God Ram Chandra. And I am not differentiating a Hindu or a muslim or a Sikh. I am just raising a growing concern. I my view, if a Sikh is not able to follow the basic principles set by our Gurus in which most important is the Sikh identity i.e. unshorn hair and Turban on the head he dont deserve to be the one. I know that there are many who wear have Sikh identity but are most of the time busy in vicious gossips. We can’t change the world. But we should not remain insatiable in our attempt. Waheguru ji ka Khalsa, Waheguru ji ki Fateh. nbagga said: Girls forcing to cut hair and get clean shaved is not the reason i agree with at all…i have so many friends who have cut their hair and trim their beard just because it’s not cool anymore..they feel embarrassed by the appearance..I live in Australia and i have seen so many of them..when they travel back home grow a little beard and put on the turban to be still identified as a SIKH..i say those who don’t keep Gurmukhi they have definetly converted back to Hindus and they shouldn’t be SINGH any more just like anyother punjabi. Manpreet bhai ji as far the concern of Sikhism suffering in future is concerned…if you see there is a decline in every religion as the world is changing..we cannot hold or control anything but we can only try to give the same values to next Generations and make it less controversial by identifying other Punjabis as Hindu despite their belief in the same religion. We are one not forget Sri Guru Nanak Dev Ji was born to a hindu Sri Mehta Kalu Ji and baba ji firmly believed and worshipped Lord Ram that’s why we see name of Lord Ram in our holy pride Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji. It’s time we stop looking at people differently if someone’s not wearing a turban..Oh he is Hindu..Oh he has a long beard and wearing Turban thats our very own SIKH brother. I think people worry more about to be physically identified as a SIKH at times and tend to forget the basic teachings of Baba ji as in Vand Chakkna, Kirat Karna, Naam Japna. I don’t the statistics but most of our community is know and famous for indulging in heavy drinking and feasting on non veg…isn’t that something we should be concerned about other than the physical attributes. Waheguru ji ka Khalsa, Waheguru ji ki Fateh. …
Added by Manpreet Singh at 10:29am on June 28, 2012
Comment on: Topic ‘GURMAT CRASH COURSE – How to apply teachings of Guru Nanak Devji today?’
human being who faithfully believes in One Immortal Being; ten Gurus, from Guru Nanak Dev to Sri Guru Gobind Singh; Sri Guru Granth Sahib; the teachings of the ten Gurus and the baptism bequeathed by the tenth Guru; and who does not owe allegiance to any other religion”. Sikhs believe in the equality of humankind, the concept of universal brotherhood of man and One Supreme God (Ik Onkar). Sikhs are also recognized by their 5 Ks. 1) Kesh, hair 2) Kara, steel bangle 3) Kirpan, small sword in a gatra strap. 4) Kashera, specially designed underpants, 5) Kanga, comb under turban. These only apply to Baptized(Khalsa) Sikhs. Guru Harkrishan Ji (1656 –1664) was the eighth Guru very young age. In any age no matter how old we are, we can learn from youth or from older person. Forcing any one is not an answer but, we can ask as youth get together have your friends join the Camps share your views with each other join Sikh Chat like Khalsabook ask them a question to get more knowledge open your own dialog in khalsabook. This is the opportunity you all have. I wish if we could have this opportunity when we were in your age. Go to Gurudwara for Sangat & Pangat. What guru ji says in Guru Granth Sahib ji ਪੰਨਾ 168, ਸਤਰ 5ਤਿਉ ਸਤਿਗੁਰ ਸਿਖ ਪ੍ਰੀਤਿ ਹਰਿ ਹਰਿ ਕੀ ਗੁਰੁ ਸਿਖ ਰਖੈ ਜੀਅ ਨਾਲੀ ॥੨॥Tieo saṯgur sikẖ parīṯ har har kī gur sikẖ rakẖai jī▫a nālī. ||2||In just the same way, the True Guru loves His Sikhs. The Lord cherishes His GurSikhs, and keeps them clasped to His Heart. || ਪੰਨਾ 286, ਸਤਰ 14ਸਤਿਗੁਰੁ ਸਿਖ ਕੀ ਕਰੈ ਪ੍ਰਤਿਪਾਲ ॥Saṯgur sikẖ kī karai parṯipāl.The True Guru cherishes His Sikh ਪੰਨਾ 286, ਸਤਰ 15ਸਤਿਗੁਰੁ ਸਿਖ ਕੇ ਬੰਧਨ ਕਾਟੈ ॥Saṯgur sikẖ ke banḏẖan kātai.The True Guru cuts away the bonds of His Sikh

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s